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Smart Female Musicians and Producers

Some of my musical Sheros

on Aug 23, 2013 in Articles, Smart Female Musicians and Producers |

Shero corner Daphne Orams 31st December 1925 ~ 5th January 2003 Originator and first director of the groundbreaking BBC radiophonics workshop. Most famous for the iconic Dr Who theme. When she was 20 Daphne got a job at the BBC working as Junior Studio Engineer and “music balancer” (She took this job instead of the place she had been offered at the Royal College of Music ) She was fascinated by electronic music and started a serious campaign with her bosses at the BBC to convince them to build their own electronic studio. In the meantime she was staying late into the night chaining the existing (early version) BBC tape machines together to create a makeshift studio, then taking it all apart before anyone else started work in the morning. The BBC got more interested and after commissioning Daphne and Desmond Briscoe to compose some some electronic sounds for their drama programs, finally founded the Radiophonic Workshop in the BBC’s Maida Vale studio in 1958. She is also credited with creating one of the first synthesiser and sequencers. “It represents the first time in England that someone had built a device that was capable of synthesis and composition at the same time,” Dr Mick Grierson director of the Daphne Oram Collection. It was called the Oramics and could translate drawings (executed on to 35 mm film ) into audio. She developed the Oramics with engineer Graham Wrench starting with virtually no budget, one of the early versions of this proto synthesizer used an old commode for the machine body and a broom handle for part of the tensioning mechanism. She eventually got some funding from the gulbenkian foundation, £4,500 in all, to complete it. The first drawn sound composition using the machine, entitled “Contrasts Essonic”, was recorded in 1968. The Science museum now has the Oramics in its collection, sadly they have decided it is too fragile to restore to working condition but it will be on show from June this year, they have also commissioned an Iphone Oramics app.daphneoram.orghttp://www.myspace.com/daphneoram Sourceshttp://www.soundonsound.comhttp://news.bbc.co.ukdaphneoram.orgDaphne Oram click for more Sister Rosetta Tharpe One cool cat, Carol Kaye Legendary bass player Carol Kaye I just wanted to big up one of my all time...

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Female Guitarists

on Feb 8, 2013 in Articles, Smart Female Musicians and Producers |

Female Guitarists guest blog by Christine Backer   When it comes to making sweet music, many people don’t realise that musical talent isn’t entirely dependent on having a penis, which means that sadly female guitarists are frequently left out of the ‘Best Guitarists Of All Time’ lists. In an attempt to redress the balance, and remind people in general that women who rock are just about all over the place if you care to look, here is a list of 10   Liz Phair   “Who?” you may well ask of the first entry on our list. Well, uneducated person, Liz Phair is one of the greatest indie rock guitarists of all time. Her debut album ‘Exile in Guyville’ was named one of the 500 greatest albums of all time by Rolling Stone and she has had a wide career spanning from 1991 right through to today.   Check her out at: www.facebook.com/lizphair     Dolly Parton   You definitely know who Dolly is, as one of the most famous singer/songwriters on the planet, proving that a winning smile and a little Southern charm go a long way, but a magical ear for a melody goes even further. Dolly Parton has been a well known country singer since 1955 and has composed over 3000 songs, including the Whitney Houston hit ‘I Will Always Love You’, and her own hits ‘Jolene’ and ‘9 to 5’   Check her out at: www.dollyparton.com (great fingerpicking and her hair is epic felix x)     Sister Rosetta Tharpe   The oldest entry on our list, her career spanning from 1919 – 1973, Sister Rosetta was the gospel singer with a difference who inspired music as it is today. In her day a very controversial musician, playing nightclubs and veering into blues and swing territory, Sister Rosetta Tharpe is credited with inspiring Elvis Presley and Johnny Cash amongst others.   (recorded in Manchester uk 1964 -Sister Rosa burns it up – she definitely inspires me love this Felix x )       Joan Jett   She loves Rock n Roll! Love it or hate it, ‘I love Rock n Roll’ is one of the biggest rock anthems of all time, and Joan Jett...

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Cool electronic ladies from yesteryear Daphne Orams

on Dec 12, 2011 in Smart Female Musicians and Producers |

Daphne Orams 31st December 1925 ~ 5th January 2003 Originator and first director of the groundbreaking BBC radiophonics workshop. Most famous for the iconic Dr Who theme. When she was 20  Daphne got a job at the BBC working as  Junior Studio Engineer and “music balancer” (She took this job instead of the place she had been offered at the Royal College of Music ) She was fascinated by electronic music and started a serious campaign with her bosses at the BBC to convince them to build their own electronic studio. In the meantime she was staying late into the night chaining the existing (early version) BBC tape machines together to create a makeshift studio, then taking it all apart before anyone else started work in the morning. The BBC got more interested and after commissioning  Daphne and Desmond Briscoe to compose some some electronic sounds for their drama programs, finally founded the Radiophonic Workshop in the BBC’s Maida Vale studio in 1958. She is also credited with creating one of the first synthesiser and sequencers. “It represents the first time in England that someone had built a device that was capable of synthesis and composition at the same time,” Dr Mick Grierson director of the Daphne Oram Collection. It was called the Oramics and could translate drawings (executed on to 35 mm film ) into audio. She developed the Oramics with engineer Graham Wrench starting with virtually no budget, one of the early versions of this proto synthesizer used  an old commode for the machine body and a broom handle for part of the tensioning mechanism. She eventually got some funding from the gulbenkian foundation,  £4,500 in all, to complete it. The first drawn sound composition using the machine, entitled “Contrasts Essonic”, was recorded in 1968. The Science museum now has the Oramics in its collection, sadly they have decided it is too fragile to restore to working condition but it will be on show from June this year, they have also commissioned an Iphone Oramics app.daphneoram.orghttp://www.myspace.com/daphneoram...

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